Compelling Case Against Change…

Have you heard  reasons given by people who cling to tired routines? The other day the dean of a university’s education department claimed to his audience that he’d like to make changes, but that his university was required to train teachers for schools that already exist out there.

Not one person questioned this shocking statement. Yikes! No wonder schools and universities remain locked in toxic ruts while brilliant minds and high-performance innovators tend to leave academe behind as they leap ahead.

Excuses against change seem compelling at first

Universities claim they can’t change because secondary schools expect them to remain  what they are now.

Secondary schools sense they can’t change because universities challenge them to stay the same.

People can’t change because cynics criticize their every new step and they fear reprisal.

A case against change swirls within every stagnant eddy …

The economy’s slipped into a slump …

Nobody else around you risks change …

Leaders don’t facilitate growth needs where you work …

Do you find yourself thinking –  I can’t ….  They won’t …. It’s impossible …?

If so, why not shift into question mode – ask What if…? – and watch your brain rewire for growth …

It’s how the human brain works best. Suddenly curiosity will enable you to think more like Einstein, and other high-performance minds will impact yours.  You’ll likely soon be wondering …

What if universities set a new pace for secondary schools by leading people to higher peaks?

What if secondary schools risked change by exchanging boring lectures for active learning?

The cutting edge question what if…? sparks new dendrites for amazing innovation. How so?

Armed with the right question, even in fast-driven multimedia charged circles, the brain synapses with fuel or an impetus for improvement and growth. How so?

Your brain rewires itself during an amazing natural process called plasticity, whenever the brain is stimulated.  Contrary to what some who retain ruts believe,  brains are not made for repetition, according to Krishna Shenoy’s recent research.   Remain passive and far less rewiring occurs.  The opposite is also true. To change, grow and improve is to remain active, flexible and attentive to the world around you. Your brain will  literally  reshape itself or stretch its plasticity,  based on the risks you act on today.

We’ve all likely remained in ruts that stomp out growth, because of some external or internal force that prevents change at times. How could you respond  to the question what if … today though, in order to rejuvenate one stagnant segment of your day, by engaging one powerful part of your brain’s plasticity?

13 thoughts on “Compelling Case Against Change…

  1. rummuser

    “Most people are like barnacles. Their existential purpose is to get fixed to a rock and die there. ” This statement came my way many decades ago when I attended a self development program. It has stuck with me all these years and I find it so true in real life that among my friends we use this term as a description of anyone who seems to be stuck in a rut or time frame.

    To break out of this rut, which now a days is being called the comfort zone, is difficult for many people.

    In my group of close friends for instance, among about ten, there are only two who have learned how to use the computer. The others simply do not want to, and depend on others to do whatever needs to be done on computers or use other methods.

    I call them barnacles and they laugh at themselves but they can afford to do so now at this late stage of their lives, but it is annoying to me that they lose the opportunity to learn so many things by just learning how to surf the net!

    Curiosity, thirst for knowledge, building bridges are all possible but rarely used by most people. Sad.

    rummusers last blog post..Living A Life Of Fulfillment.

  2. eweber Post author

    Wow – that is quite a metaphor:-). Sadly it fits even me at times!

    My question is: How can we inspire people in our circles to use more of their curiosity as a pathways to new adventures — regardless of age? Thoughts?

  3. Pingback: Wired for War or Poised for Peace? – Brain Leaders and Learners

  4. Pingback: Brain Chemicals - Drugs of Choice – Brain Leaders and Learners

  5. Pingback: Age Gracious or Voracious? – Brain Leaders and Learners

  6. Pingback: Train Dolphins but “Develop” Human Brains – Brain Leaders and Learners

  7. Pingback: Broken Schools and Brainy Teens – Brain Leaders and Learners

  8. Pingback: Brainpowered Tools to Disagree – Brain Leaders and Learners

  9. Pingback: No Excuses - where to start? | 7 Green Stairs

  10. Pingback: Characters that Show Up at Work – Brain Leaders and Learners

  11. Pingback: Holiday Blues for Business Boom – Brain Leaders and Learners

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *