Category Archives: depression

Mental Tools in Stress Free Zones

The problem with stress is that it masks as winner – so you miss its killer qualities and fail to spot danger signs before it strikes.

Stress kills!

A Brain on Depression – Tribute to Trey Pennington

Trey Pennington is gone, and will be sadly missed by an entire world. But is your brain headed toward depression today?

One three-pound brain, consistency of raw egg, continually rewires for or against stress and depression on a daily basis. But did you know your brain can fight back? Medicines increasingly improve in ways that raise serotonin’s well being and reduce cortisol’s toxic attacks. The key is to become aware of depressions stalking persistence. Rather than lose hope – reach out to trusted others who crack you up or who may be stronger at the moment you slip into mental toxins that work against your brain’s strengths.

Holiday Blues for Business Boom

Ever notice how Thanksgiving and Christmas tend to bring out blues in some and blessings in others? Or how lonely people see vast spaces between themselves and others – even at festive  holiday tables? First glances  show people blessed with close family and  friends feel blessed over holidays while those… Read more »

Snip your Amygdala Before you Snipe Back

Did you know that emotions survive after memories vanish? Or do you wonder what moods and behavior heads or hearts control? Yesterday,  on a walk in the woods with a gifted young leader, I once again saw his ethics, openness and willingness to become vulnerable in order to learn new… Read more »

Expect to Bypass Bullies and Cynics at Work

Susan Boyle  shut down because of bullies in her youth.  New York Times tells us bullies and cynics are on the rise. Any stomped out innovation because of cynics or bullies where you work? Sometimes we tend to take cynicism, rage and intimidation of bullies in stride. Other times, we… Read more »

Lighten Up – the SAD Story

During my two years on Baffin Island, up near Greenland, while teaching for McGill University, I both slept more and ate more during dark months where we saw no sunlight at all. Likely your shifts from light to dark are less extreme, but nevertheless, the brain’s reactions to daytime darkness… Read more »