George Lucas on Creativity and Business

Live in Radio City Hall, this evening – George Lucas admitted he hates writing and hates business even more. Considering this maestro’s highly innovative mind, and lifetime successes, what does this statement say about teaching and learning approaches we cling to?

fact is that most teens admit to being bored at school, and over 70% of employees dislike work.

Lucas’ fascination with the social sciences influenced him to study and apply areas such as anthropology. He would have loved the MITA approach for its applications to a learners’ talents and passions. The college that accepted him had a cinematography department, though, and he found he was both passionate and good at it.

While we hoped to become a documentary film maker, Lucas had no interest at first in the kind of films he later spent his life creating. “In one word the business of film is sleazy,” according to Lucas.

Are you anything like George Lucas, who  wanted more freedom to create in his way – rather than suffer interference from Hollywood. The master of innovation  spoke of how film industry was closed to all young talent — because they allowed in their own only, and closed out people on the outside.

Have you seen issues of money or politics dictate limitations?  George Lucas never really wanted to make money, but passionately wanted to make art. It’s the same for him today. In art you make an emotional connection to people. Art is a way of telling stories to the population in a meaningful and emotional way.

According to Lucas, there’s a lot to be said for civil discourse in running a corporation  – which this country seems to have lost. He continues to work in education to find and record the best practices, so that learning stockpiles tools that really work.

We are drowning as a society, Lucas said, but we need to create knowledge and pass it on to the next generation

4 Comments

  1. Barbara Young says:

    Thank you for passing this on. As an educator I’m finding that heros for our younger generation are sorely lacking in the creative intelligence such as Mr. Lucas embodies.

    As a society I hope that we are finally realizing that if we don’t artistically pass on our folklore, no matter what that may be to each individual, our civilization may just be going the way of the dinosaur…. too busy looking forward in “survival” mode to see extinction sneeking up behind at full speed.

  2. George Lucas has captured the minds of my grandsons, age 13, 11, 8, and 7. I had no idea that someone from an earlier generation might have that pull today. Children need heroes with accomplishments in the arts as you advocate, Barbara.

  3. eweber says:

    Barbara, you are right about the need to have heroes for the young, and what a fine example here! I agree:-)

    We need to encourage innovation, and problem solving – and that means we teach the strategies for developing and using both:-) Thanks for this reminder. many of our most creative youth are bored by a system created for past eras and clinging to outmoded practices. Your voice here is like a lovely clarion call!

  4. eweber says:

    Thanks Robyn, you said it better than I did! Bravo!

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