50 Questions to Lead Bloggers

Leadership is changing fast and if ASTD is right in 2012 Leadership Handbook– a new kind of leader is already on the horizon! Could any of the new era leaders listed below help to usher in that finer future we all crave?

Dr. Jon Warner

Dr. Jon Warner at Leadership and Management posted 50 blogs listed below using the Alexa rank, a ranking raw score for web site popularity. Alexa measures how popular a site is (from 1 being Google, 2, Facebook and 3, YouTube, all the way down to the 40 millionth or so active site on the web as of July 2012).

Dr. Warner included names of the individual bloggers here, and a brief summary about the blog. Curious about leadership that ASTD suggests will be new and different in coming era, I posed  critical questions to learn new-Century skills from top leaders on Warner’s list below.

Hope you too will add a mind-bender of your own or help respond to one of mine.

# Top Leader Blogs
Alexa Rank (7/12/12) Questions to Lead Bloggers and to you!
1 Seth Godin
Author and speaker
6,432 What is the first critical step from new idea or creative insight that rolls into doable change?
2 Michael Hyatt
Author, consultant and speaker
17,699 What most hidden trait separates intentional leaders from those who struggle to support leadership talents?
3 Michael McKinney
Leadership Now
Author, consultant,
108,092 What first practical step moves a business into purposeful interactions across a wider community?
4 Wayne Dyer
Author and speaker
124,038 How does a person who faces much criticism or disadvantage find ways to better motivate themselves and others?
5 Dan Rockwell
Leadership Freak
Coach, trainer, mentor
130,241 How could we strengthen mentoring or coaching through better use of social media?
6 Daniel Pink
Author and speaker
151,190 What would motivate a struggling business to care more about  neuro-scientific/psychological underpinnings?
7 John Hunter
Curious Cat
Consultant
220,500 How could we reconfigure broken systems in lingo that generates innovation and avoids jargon?
8 Mike Figliuolo
Thought Leaders
Consultant, coach,
231,029 How would you advise any organization to get the most out of  practical skill-building development at work?
9 Bob Burg
Author and speaker
255,798 In one motivational sentence how does one build better relationships by giving more in order to achieve more?
10 Terry St. Marie
Consultant and coach
269,303 How does a naysayer shift to power of being positive as a person and a leader, in order to gain more?
11 Dan McCarthy
Great Leadership
Author and consultant
329,990 What can be done to inspire top leaders to help reconfigure HR in ways that gain new results from all?
12 Gina Abudi
Consultant and coach
360,883 What opening sentence of a new book would build curiosity for better project and process management?
13 John Maxwell
Author, consultant, coach and speaker
374,239 Why do so few run with qualities and competencies needed to be a leader in many organizational settings?
14 Kevin Eikenberry
Consultant and speaker
380,231 How does Remarkable Leadership move one great (but unknown new idea) into sustainable action.
15 Wally Bock
Three Star Leadership
Author and consultant
411,752 Why do so many managers miss their mark to perform at a better or higher level, and what would change that?
16 Mike Myatt
N2Growth
Consultant and coach
461,648 What should differ in organizational development to build a finer future in any organization?
17 Steve Roesler
All Things Workplace
Consultant and coach
619,720 Why do some coaches fail to get results in spite of their qualified skills and apparently good methods?
18 Tom Schulte
Linked2Leadership
Author and consultant
663,554 What is the greatest key to sustainable organizational health, and personal or professional career growth?
19 Todd Nielsen
A Slice of Leadership
Consultant
695,061 How do you reject the status-quo and concentrate on better processes or methodologies in spite of threats?
20 Mark Sandborn
Author, consultant, speaker
716,280 Does leadership development always relate to personal development and effective teambuilding?
21 Scott Eblin
Coach, author and speaker
720,537 How can “the right” behaviors and mindsets be taught by younger upstarts to out of touch veterans?
22 Bea Fields
Consultant and coach
728,917 Where does leadership development start and end in the most successful situations?
23 Jon Gordon
Author, speaker and consultant
852,529 How do you  inspire people or organizations who work without vision, passion, positivity and purpose?
24 Ben Lichtenwalner
Servant Leader
Consultant and coach
876,660 Why would a greedy leader shift to servant leadership, help others, or adopt servant practices by taking action?
25 Ellen Weber
Brain Leaders & Learners
Author and consultant
884,337 How does a whole brain MITA™ approach foster more innovative leading and learning to those who resist change?
26 David Zinger
Consultant
948,636 What is the core component of authentic relationships and how do these achieve proven better results?
27 Art Petty
Coach, trainer, author
958,215 What about those who suggest critical thinking and decision-making, means merely criticizing others?
28 Mary Jo Asmus
Coach and consultant
1,044,164 Where’s the sustainable profit for those who improve, and sustain relationships with others?
29 Susan Mazza
Random Acts of Leadership
Consultant and coach
1,066,265 Why do so many organizations fail to  translate leadership into evidence of  improved performance?
30 Steve Farber
Author, consultant
1,268,162 How do moderate thinkers shift to  “Extreme Leadership” approaches at all levels?
31 Gwyn Teatro
Consultant and coach
1,424,303 How do under-valued and under-rewarded staff shift into high-performance minds?
32 Rich Gee
Consultant and coach
1,503,923 How do you motivate strong-willed leaders to think differently in order to gain better results?
33 Lisa Rosendahl
Consultant and speaker
1,512,886 How do you better manage human resources in a climate where people and leaders resist change?
34 Michael Ray Hopkin
Lead on Purpose
Consultant and speaker
1,553,883 How does persuasion help strong-minded people who enjoy wrestling with opposing views, to work better?
35 Andrew Bryant
Self Leadership
Consultant, coach speaker
1,609,735 What does  self development do to improve leadership development and why should folks care?
36 Ed Brenegar
Leading Questions
Consultant and coach
1,786,888 Where do transitional and visioning skills get lost in an organization and how can they open opportunities?
37 Geoff Snyder
Author
1,823,881 What would your learning systems do differently and how would they get launched in sustainable ways?
38 Tom Foster
Management blog
Consultant
1,925,549 What about folks who insist that without one strong leader – teams will fall into chaos and not lead at all?
39 Andrew Rondeau
Great Management
Consultant
2,079,020 How can a small business compete when resources and power is often controlled by big business interests?
40 Jon Warner
ReadyToManage
Author, consultant,coach
2,096,788 What would it take to reframe how we think about and foster soft skill development with proven results?
41 John Spence
Consultant and speaker
2,166,704 What’s the first step to gaining international experience through strategic thinking, teamwork, and leadership?
42 Frank Kanu
Genious One
Consultant, speaker
2,701,894 How do you foster and stretch creative thinking in an organization that insists innovation cannot help the bottom line?
43 Cheri Baker
Consultant and trainer
2,758,510 What do you do when bullies control dysfunctional teams and managers appear incapable of dealing with it?
44 Cheryl Cran
Consultant, trainer, speaker
2,860,180 How could organizations gain more value from multi-generational offerings at work?
45 Michelle Malay Carter
Mission Minded Mgt
Consultant, speaker
2,888,993 How do you integrate talent management with organizational design so people gain empowerment?
46 Jim Stroup
Managing Leadership
Consultant
3,291,368 Where do leaders and organizations most lack strategy, design and execution brilliance?
47 Michael Lee Stallard
Consultant, coach and speaker
3,315,889 What team building strategy would most surprise or delight your readers because of its top results?
48 Lisa Hanneberg
Management Craft
Consultant and trainer
3,630,380 If you could only garner one lesson from life to improve business most, what would that lesson be?
49 Erika Andersen
Author and  consultant
4,945,000 How does a leader move most effectively from a shared vision into shared support and productivity?
50 John Baldoni
Coach and consultant
5,330,891 What does it take for leaders to gain wider support and new opportunities to effect change?

Thanks Dr. Jon Warner, for your leadership wisdom and for generating this list of innovative leaders for the 21st Century.

Thanks fellow leaders for moving wisdom into wealth for a new generation of winners!

27 Comments

  1. Intentional leaders know the answer to the question “why?” Why am I doing this? Why are we doing this? If they don’t know the answer, they get clear before proceeding toward an objective.

    Thanks. This is a great list.

  2. eweber says:

    Michael, yes I agree and thanks! What you suggest here is so true for the intentional leader.

    Guess I am standing alongside the leader who is less intentional – to dig deeper for “intentional” approaches that leader may become more deliberate in ways that win.

    Sense you have answers for that leader too. Some folks suggest we’ve left them behind and we’d be richer if they jumped back into the race. Thoughts? Ellen

  3. Bob Burg says:

    Hi Ellen. In response to your question, I’d say it’s focusing on providing value to the other person in a way that … THEY see it as being of value! In other words, it’s not about what *we* think they *should* value, but rather discovering what it means to them.

  4. eweber says:

    Thanks Bob — what’s kind of cool here is that you are tapping into the realm of a leader’s intrapersonal IQ. Only a leader with high intuitive IQ can see what a value means to others. So how is this developed further?

    The interesting part is that every time a leader takes a step in the direction you suggest here — and attempts to see through another’s perspective, that action literally rewires the brain for more of the same. Now that is renaissaince leadership!

    Thanks for the winning brain based approach, Bob!

  5. Steve Farber says:

    Hi Ellen.

    Fundamentally, the Extreme Leadership transition at any level begins with asking yourself (regardless of your position or title) this question: “What can I do, right now–regardless of what anyone else around here is or is not doing–to change my piece of this team/company/industry/community/world/World for the better?” And then doing it, of course.

    Thanks for asking!

    –Farber

  6. eweber says:

    Steve, what a gem you described here and thanks. We use a somewhat similar approach in Mita – titled a One Minute Mind Move, but I really like the idea of changing one piece for the better.

    Can you see the fireworks of delight in any organization?

    To step into that place of making one improvement – is also to spread the gems you offered here because the brain comes with mimicking equipment. So others around the change agent would catch the wonder!

    What life – so glad you shared it, Steve!

  7. Gwyn Teatro says:

    Hi Ellen ~ In answer to your question, I think having something to care about that goes beyond our own immediate needs helps us shift from low to high gear, performance-wise. If we go to work feeling like a replaceable cog in the wheel of commerce there is not much there that will incite us to give our best effort.
    For me, a leader’s most important job is to help people find meaning in the work they do. That means helping them see and embrace a clear organizational purpose and letting them know, in a variety of ways, that they, their experience, talents and ideas matter to the fulfillment of that purpose. This isn’t just a ‘nice-to-do’. It makes good business sense. When people are connected and engaged in meaningful work, I suspect they produce much better results and realize greater rewards, both intrinsically and extrinsically.
    Thanks Ellen, for asking the question and for compiling such a great set of questions . I’m honoured to be part of it.

  8. eweber says:

    Thanks for stopping by Gwyn. Love your notion that: “having something to care about that goes beyond our own immediate needs helps us shift from low to high gear, performance-wise. If we go to work feeling like a replaceable cog in the wheel of commerce there is not much there that will incite us to give our best effort.”

    You are addressing a person’s inner voice here and how we monitor that inner voice plays a big part in shifting those gears – from the brain’s perspective. I showed the brain’s perspective on your keen insights at http://goo.gl/gBSh9

    Especially intriguing is your sense that we can, “help people find meaning in the work they do, so that they see and embrace a clear organizational purpose.”

    Seems to me the next part would sustain value that gets lost daily in many organizations, by taking your advice to, ” let them know that they, their experience, talents and ideas matter to the fulfillment of that purpose. We like to use a Celebration of Innovation to Help make that happen. You?

    Just read research support for your suggestion that, “When people are connected and engaged in meaningful work, … they produce much better results and realize greater rewards, both intrinsically and extrinsically.”

    Harvard Business School’s Teresa Amabile recently asked over 200 professionals, what makes people do their most creative work? Her research team found (in over 12,000 pages of data) that people do best when they make personal progress in meaningful work.

    Thanks Gwyn, for compelling ideas from your leadership corner! You’ve inspired us all. Ellen

  9. I love what you’ve done here, Ellen – thanks for the thought provoking questions. Regarding your question to me:

    Why would a greedy leader shift to servant leadership, help others, or adopt servant practices by taking action?

    Authentic Leadership: I believe the only form of authentic leadership is servant leadership. If you’re not serving others, you are serving self-interests. Therefore, you are not truly a leader.

    Expand Your Influence: Whatever you achieve today will be made greater by shifting to a servant leadership approach. As you serve others, you will gain commitment and a greater tribe.

    Benefits of Social Media: Furthermore, there has been no greater time in history than now, to be a servant leader. The opportunities presented by emerging social media empower authentic leaders for the greatest degree of influence, ever.

    Imagine what great leaders from history like Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Mahatma Gandhi and others would have done with the tools we have today?

    Thanks for sharing Ellen. Keep up the great work and please, keep serving…

  10. eweber says:

    Thanks for your kind words, Ben, and thanks also for gracing us all with your compelling notions of service. We can learn much from your shifts that make it happen.

    Loved your response to the question – Why would a greedy leader shift to servant leadership, help others, or adopt servant practices by taking action?

    With your contrasts of authentic leadership, you show why leaders who are not serving others are likely serving self-interests. So true, we are not fully leaders while we look at what’s in it for us. So where does that leave the average leader?

    Yikes, while one wants to quickly point to the over-the-edge greed or compromise of current leaders, you make it far more useful to see ways that we each can become servants as leaders. Love it – and your wisdom makes it worth another shot this week!

    Cannot agree with you more that, “As you serve others, you will gain commitment and a greater tribe,” and yet you say it so poignantly that it seems worth all the starts, spits and stalls to get it right. Maybe that’s why I love to invite and engage much feedback from leaders I facilitate – so that I can determine new places to build the kind of communities you emulate.

    Yes, benefits of Social Media rock!

    Mind if I add additional notables like, Eva Peron, Rosa Parks and Florence Nightingale to your Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Mahatma Gandhi list of greats :-) ?

    Wow Ben – memorable leaders you named here would likely have taken social media tools we have today and done much like you are doing here – encouraging other leaders to keep up the great work and to keep serving…

    So glad we met through Jon’s blogger list.

  11. Ellen – you asked: “If you could only garner one lesson from life to improve business most, what would that lesson be?” And the answer is also found in your post. Not in only your words, but in the effort you have demonstrated. The one lesson I would garner is that to make something happen, we need to do something – do something — do something new, do something different, do something better, do something for longer, do something with others. It’s about showing up – really showing up. That is what changes things. The extraordinary effort you have shown with this post, all the provocative questions, and your deep interest that comes through in your words is a great demonstration of the lesson. Bravo to you!

  12. eweber says:

    Lisa, thanks for jumping on the question, “If you could only garner one lesson from life to improve business most, what would that lesson be?”

    Thanks also for finding value in my 2-bits and for bring that lived experience into the fore.

    I’d like to highlight your key notion as stated in your words:

    “The one lesson I would garner is that to make something happen, we need to do something – do something — do something new, do something different, do something better, do something for longer, do something with others.”

    Lisa you make the “showing up” so doable and far richer than we often recognize. No wonder change will often be inevitable to the faithful doer! What a dayspring for a new week! Thanks!

    When I looked at the many leaders in this community like yourself, who teach and inspire me provocative questions simply began to ask themselves – cause I was hungry for more! Maybe that is the essence of what community becomes on any topic – and the high-performance mind has never before been more needed in our leaders!

    Will be taking your “DO” challenge into a very busy week – and trusting yours too will continue to generate prosperity from every leadership corner!

  13. Ellen -

    I love your question to me, “How does a leader move most effectively from a shared vision into shared support and productivity?” This critical point – transition from shared vision to shared action – is the best and most important use of strategy. When leaders engage their followers in creating clear strategies – that is, core directional choices about how to move toward the vision – and then co-create the tactics for implementing those strategies, the vision is most likely to come to fruition. (At the risk of seeming completely self-aggrandizing, I’d suggest you might want to read my book Being Strategic…the answer to your question is at the heart of it.)

    Thank you!
    Erika

  14. eweber says:

    Thanks Erika, for tackling the challenge to show us, “How does a leader move most effectively from a shared vision into shared support and productivity?”

    I’m especially intrigued here at how leaders engage folks to create the clear strategies as core directional choices about how to move toward the vision.

    That process of co-creating effective tactics for implementing a vision would certainly alter a team or can even shift directions an organization.

    Thanks for letting us know about your book, Being Strategic (at http://goo.gl/7V8Qp ) where folks can explore more detailed illustrations your suggestions to co-create tools that build together.

    Would you agree Erika, that the actual doing can fall through the cracks unless there is follow up to keep both creation of plans and doing related actions well and alive? Ellen

  15. Mike Myatt says:

    Hi Ellen:

    Your Question: What should differ in organizational development to build a finer future in any organization?

    My Answer: The cultural taxonomy of organizations are already undergoing great change. The transition away from rigid hierarchal structures toward loose collaborative networks has already begun. Think open source rather than proprietary. Smart leaders don’t put people in boxes, they unleash their potential by freeing them from boxes. Organizations which drive complex decisions to the fringes of the enterprise will be more much more scalable and successful than organizations which rely solely on outdated top down decision models. Leaders must not focus on leveraging their people, but creating leverage for their people – a subtle yet powerful distinction.

    Thanks for your question Ellen.

  16. eweber says:

    Thanks Mike for addressing the question:

    What should differ in organizational development to build a finer future in any organization?

    Mike, I love how you set the scene here in the midst of more progressive organizations! You framed delightfully new directions as … “The transition away from rigid hierarchal structures toward loose collaborative networks has already begun.” What hope and promise you hold out!

    Perhaps it also speaks possibilities to those many leaders and employees we meet who still feel weighted down by rusty chains and sluggish quagmires of tired or broken systems they serve.

    Thanks for helping us all to, “Think open source rather than proprietary.”

    To your notion that, “Smart leaders don’t put people in boxes, they unleash their potential by freeing them from boxes,” I again see new powers about the human brain caught in stress (http://goo.gl/nIcOE )from the rigidity of broken systems you suggest many are leaving, and freeing advances with a new mantra (http://goo.gl/rAkfH ) here that you suggest from your expertise.

    Your conclusion is my mantra for the day! “Leaders must not focus
    on leveraging their people, but creating leverage for their people – a subtle yet powerful distinction.” Empowering!

    Kudos Mike – it’s an honor to hear more about your rejuvenated insights on a leadership topic and challenge we all care about! Ellen

  17. Ellen -

    You ask if I agree ” that the actual doing can fall through the cracks unless there is follow up to keep both creation of plans and doing related actions well and alive?”

    Absolutely! When we do vision and strategy work with our clients, we support them to decide how to use their plan (vision, obstacles, strategies and tactics) as a “map of the work”; how to regularly check in on progress and figure out how to reposition as necessary to keep moving forward.

    Erika

  18. Jon Warner says:

    Thanks for the mention of my article Ellen. From what I can tell from all the leadership blog postings I have read in recent times, leaders need to be great networkers online-we are in a truly momentous age in terms of the Internet right now and it will massivley transform the working world as a whole in the next few decades.

  19. eweber says:

    Thanks Jon, for drawing together people with solutions and new leadership prospects.

    Interesting observation that “ leaders need to be great networkers online.”

    Was thinking that would make a fun post related to how the brain prospers leadership through networking:-)

    Now curious about how revolutionary verses stuck-in-ruts leaders network in terms of:

    1). Service?
    2). Engagement?
    3). Use of clicks?
    4). Improvements?
    5). Talent development?
    6). Inclusion?
    7). Conflict resolution?
    8). Mental fitness?
    9) Listening?
    10). Communication skills?

    Thanks for raising this question Jon. What would you add as critical determiners between good and poor leadership.

    Agree with you that “we are in a truly momentous age in terms of the Internet right now and it will massively transform the working world as a whole in the next few decades. “

  20. Hi Ellen.

    First, thanks for including me on the list. Great stuff. You asked: How would you advise any organization to get the most out of practical skill-building development at work?

    1. Actually make the investment in training your people. Don’t say “people are our most important asset” then cancel training (or not even send them) because “the budget is tight.”

    2. Ensure the training fills a clear skill gap. Don’t just go buy a course (and for heaven’s sake, don’t work with trainers who push a course). Instead, clearly identify the skill need then seek trainers who understand that need and can provide a solution to it.

    3. Make sure the training is applicable to their jobs. Complex frameworks may look awesome but no one will apply them. Find the simple, elegant solutions people will use.

    4. Have senior management support the use of the new skills. This starts with HAVING SENIOR MANAGEMENT ATTEND THE TRAINING! Usually they’re the ones who need it more than their team members. If they don’t attend a full session, at least make sure they get briefed on the content and what they should be coaching to after their people take the course.

  21. eweber says:

    Thanks Mike for tackling the core question: : How would you advise any organization to get the most out of practical skill-building development at work?

    In your quest for more and finer training – I agree 100% with your notion of INVESTMENT as you’ve illumined it here. Training so often conjures up the bad experiences staff and leaders have with skill development as it’s been handled, by organizations. Have you found that too?

    When you suggested – “Actually make the investment in training your people. Don’t say “people are our most important asset” then cancel training (or not even send them) because “the budget is tight,” I see a whole new look at what training could be and what if often is not.

    Loved your reminder to “ensure the training fills a clear skill gap. Don’t just go buy a course (and for heaven’s sake, don’t work with trainers who push a course). Instead, clearly identify the skill need then seek trainers who understand that need and can provide a solution to it.” Wow – can you see workplaces fly with this shift in direction!

    This statement says it all — “Find the simple, elegant solutions people will use.” Yes!

    You mentioned follow-up coaching, and we have found that is the core reason that workers default back to old habits – without ongoing growth.

    Your suggestions here resonate to the core, Mike and I was wondering if you saw McKinsey’s research on training and why it often fails to get the results folks hoped for.

    Like you sketched here so well, I too have found that to motivate all employees to out-perform themselves, is to provide tools through training that leads change with impact.

    In October 2010, McKinsey Quarterly, Aaron DeSmet, Monica McGurk, and Elizabeth Schwartz, wrote the following:

    “Companies around the world spend up to $100 billion a year to train employees in the skills they need to improve corporate performance…. But training typically doesn’t have much impact. Indeed, only one-quarter of the respondents to a recent McKinsey survey said their training programs measurably improved business performance, and most companies don’t even bother to track the returns they get on their investments in training. They keep at it because a highly skilled workforce is clearly more productive and because employees often need new skills to deal with changes in an organization’s strategy or performance.”

    You may enjoy the audio on Linkedin McKinsey Quarterly. You gave us lots to chew on here, Mike. Thanks!

  22. Wally Bock says:

    The short answer to your question is that many managers don’t do better because they’re embedded in a system that almost guarantees failure. I used your question as the inspiration for a post that provides a much longer answer. It’s at

    http://blog.threestarleadership.com/2012/08/06/why-dont-managers-do-better.aspx

  23. eweber says:

    Thanks for stopping by Wally and thanks for a detailed look at the issue of broken systems and tired traditions over at Three Star Leadership!

    It’s apparent to me from your insights and from this list of fine leaders — that what we reward is what we get.

    How many times we see talented leaders excited about genuine progress that will enhance individuals and organizations. Then they take their plans to work and find themselves swamped under the weight of broken systems.

    It’s why we need to support and learn from the new leaders out who face challenges with more compelling solutions in mind. How encouraging to see that happen here and in others leaders we all value.

    Thanks for all you do to make it happen, Wally! Stay blessed!

  24. John Spence says:

    What a great idea to start a fantastic conversation – thank you Ellen!!

    As to your question to me… “What’s the first step to gaining international experience through strategic thinking, teamwork, and leadership?”

    Challenging question – here are my thoughts:

    1. Become a student of international business. Read, study, watch videos, whatever you can do in order to understand the dynamics of international business – from a distance.

    2. Try to build a network of international business people that you can interact with. Find some folks in your local town who are either from another country and doing business here – or who have traveled extensively and done business in other countries – and learn everything you can from them.

    3. Work for company that has several international offices – and then volunteer for any project that will get you sent overseas. If you have been doing step one and two above – you will be in a good position for them to take a chance on you since you have proven your desire to develop your international business skills.

    4. Finally, if you do not work for a company that has international offices – attempt to set up some business relationships and look for projects via the Internet. Find something reputable and then strike out on your own, and simply get on a plane and fly over there and make something happen. This is of course the most risky option – but there is a tremendous amount of opportunity to be successful in business in other countries – for those who are willing and courageous enough to simply go and put their feet on the ground and find out where they can add value.

    I was able to build my international business quite easily because every company I have worked for had international projects – and I volunteered for every single project they would send me on. So far I have the opportunity to work in Japan, China, Australia, New Zealand, France, Mexico, Canada, Hong Kong and all across the Caribbean. It is been a wonderful learning experience and helped me greatly in all my business activities.

    Again, Ellen, great way to generate some fantastic conversation and connection on your blog – well played! Take good care – John Spence

  25. [...] to Manage for including this site in his list of top leadership blogs, and to Dr. Ellen Weber of Brain Leaders and Learners for drawing my attention to it – I’ll get to the question posed me [...]

  26. eweber says:

    John – thanks – many of the markets you listed are also those we frequent! I agree – what a great idea to start a fantastic conversation – because folks like you have been there and have learned and led!

    Thanks for addressing the question: “What’s the first step to gaining international experience through strategic thinking, teamwork, and leadership?”

    I agree with you – that unless you become a learner in this – you cannot lead.

    That diverse network you speak of is what brings our collective work forward!

    No question – trust is built stronger when you work internationally and when you build with others in ways that benefit all concerned.

    Thanks for the way you help us all to value differences that impact the bottom line, John.

  27. Gilda says:

    I needed to thank you for this wonderful read!! I certainly enjoyed every little bit of it. I’ve got you saved as a favorite to check out new things you post…

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