Differences – Dividends or Divisions?

eweber   March 10, 2012   1 Comment

Merging cultures can make or break an organization, yet few firms tend to  unite in ways that tackle turbulent times together.  Not all amalgamations stand up to stifling challenges that follow, as too many merges trample talented people in the dust. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Differences – Dividends or Divisions?

Successful mergers include joining different minds, in ways that capitalize on distinctives in each.

Engage opposing views for innovative outcomes and you’ll also build tone that designs goodwill – even in war zones.

Merge for Dividends

One young leader contacted the MITA Center for advice on a failed merger a few weeks back. Managers tried to transport an enviable culture from a top food chain, into a new city setting with unfamiliar staff. It didn’t work.

Unsuccessful mergers follow when leaders miss key differences among people – unique traits that people possess which could add high dividends to any combined effort. When leaders ignore cultural differences they do so at their own peril. To benefit from mergers is to mine people’s proclivities for peak performances from many angles.

Questions  Foster Winning Mergers

1. How will cultural differences expand the collective vision?
2. What winning project would enlist more talent across  silos?
3. How do your mergers draw on people’s multiple intelligences?
4. How can mindguides foster curiosity and creativity across differences?
5. How can gender brain differences add value to your merger?

Address these five questions with an action plan for each and watch your merger profit in response.

Why combine differences for a more successful mergers? You’ll discover unexpected dividends to an entire organization when most workers can say that they speak and feel heard at work.

Join together with those who differ in ways that add value to all and watch your next merger offer far more than merely coming together.

One thought on “Differences – Dividends or Divisions?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>