Talent for New Revenue Streams

Wall Street claims that without big bonuses they’ll not attract big talents, or generate big profits. Do you agree?

Wall Street broke banks by trading innovation for greed. The result? Wall Street leaders now fear loss of future talent with lower salaries, while gifted leaders optimize talent to open new revenue streams.

Talent for financial growth takes intrapersonal intelligence which includes ethics and common sense. In contrast, conflict of interest stunts profitability. Have you seen revenue rise with talent surges? Or have you observed a bottom line fall under conflicts of interest? It happens far more than most people realize. How so?

If you answer no to any of these questions you may be closing financial spigots where you work:

1. Would you promote proven natural remedies,  if your salary depended on distributing costly chemicals that could cause harm?

2. Would you advocate improved performance tools, if your key revenue came from retaining broken traditional approaches?

3. Would you vote for a far more talented hire than you, to help rejuvenate your firm’s financial difficulties?

4. Would you toss your hat into the ring for cost-effective energy systems, if it meant you received less dividends for a few months?

5. Would you support an excellent civil policy, if its initiator sat on opposite sides of your political table?

Without doubt, changes for improvement get lost in a maze of conflicts within struggling firms. On the flip side, intrapersonally intelligent risk-takers move companies forward with a zest for financial growth that lasts.

Global guru, Jeffrey Sachs recently stated that we, as a nation, are still dealing economic lies in the back rooms of government and Wall Street. Do you agree?

Meanwhile the world awaits a return to ethics, and leadership talents that open financial spigots into a radical reconfiguration for money and mind. It starts with each of us.

If underlying conflicts of interest obstruct your profitability, why not plan a retreat to strengthen intrapersonal talents,  and risk mind-bending progress? Develop talents from intrapersonal intelligence and expect financial spigots to reopen as a result.

What do you think?

2 Comments

  1. Pete Wendel says:

    This question reminds me of a Michael Dell quote:

    Try never to be the smartest person in the room.
    And if you are, I suggest you invite smarter people—
    Or find a different room.
    In professional circles, it’s called networking.
    In organizations, it’s called team building.
    And in life it’s called family, friends and community.
    We are all gifts to each other.

    Michael Dell, President
    Dell Computer Corp.
    University of Texas Commencement
    Austin Texas May 17, 2003

  2. eweber says:

    Hey Pete, I love your notion of being gifts to one another, and you certainly are just that! The old “isolation” has become the modern “collaboration” – and it works well.

    It takes a new skill set though, and when leaders rise up to model it, more workers will follow it.

    What is the top skill you see that would enable collaboration to thrive in a circle?

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