Personal Intelligence for Organizational Growth

Intrapersonal intelligence offers you amazing tools for personal progress at work.

Why then do many fail to benefit from intuitive intelligence?

Become who you want others to see in you, and you’ll advance a personal IQ that stokes enthusiasm from others too.  It’s about bumping up against daily stressors without  melt-down-trends of leaders with low intrapersonal intelligence?

Intuitive IQ enables you to tame your amygdala, work incrementally, and maintain balance during mental growth spurts. Yes, even when others around you strike out themselves or criticize your game.

Personal Reflections for Organizational Results

Have you seen peers offer well being to others – even during busy schedules? People tend to emulate and admire them for holding together when others cannot cope.

Intrapersonal IQ plans ahead and comes prepared, so that others don’t panic from stressed tone.

To develop intrapersonal intelligence, is to manage time.  For the personally strong leader, enough hours expand any day to tackle targets, as well as cultivate inner contentment.

Have you noticed how the highly developed intrapersonal leader, who plans ahead, also tends to remain flexible when unexpected or disappointing events strike?

Time management runs the intrapersonally intelligent leader past stress, in much the same way beagles race past distractions to reach a hunter’s catch.  It means cultivating well being by accepting consequences of an imperfect situation. It’s about accepting reality when things go less well. It adds the kind of security that refuses to blame others, and takes responsibility for personal actions in spite of setbacks.

Intrapersonal intelligence reflects  ethics at its core.  For instance, if you tend to take responsibility for actions, even when  results are less than  hoped for, your intrapersonal intelligence kicks in to offer integrity, in spite of loss. It teaches you to design a backup plan for leadership events that could go wrong, for instance.  Then, rather than venting,  naysaying or fretting, you engage good tone and emulate well being that tosses solutions into the ring during difficult times.

Good tone draws on intrapersonal intelligence to build goodwill with those who disagree, so that you can learn from opposing views. The highly intrapersonal leader understands that perfect results are not as high a priority as one’s approach to respect others, or speak about the possibilities rather than complain about problems.

Move forward with adventure in mind, because you maintain well being, not because the workplace hands you advantages, and you will be surprised at unexpected melodies that come from intrapersonal intelligence. You know you are intrapersonally strong when you show confidence that comes from deep reflections, and from everyday acceptance of strengths and weaknesses. The opposite of blame and frustration is intrapersonal intelligence that takes the good with the bad, and finds balance in both.

The mind-bending qualities of intrapersonal magic show up well in your thoughtful communications, refusal to speak poorly of others, deep reflections for growth from lessons learned in your mistakes, and willingness to facilitate others in ways that you enjoy being engaged or guided.

Intrapersonal leaders inspire the rest of us to consider the value in mind-bending traits.  For the past few weeks we worked with an especially strong intrapersonal group of MBA leaders at The Bittner School of Business at  St. John Fisher College.  That’s why we’re all so looking forward  to  engaging the wider business community on Thursday night for the big Celebration of Innovation. Not only will  real workplace problems get confronted with innovative brainpowered solutions – but fellow leaders will be facilitated by an amazingly intrapersonal group!

6 Comments

  1. Katie Winchell says:

    Hi Ellen, thanks for an insightful post – it shines a positive light right at a deadline-heavy time in my workload. Love the mind shift from stress to adventure and the prioritizing of relationships over perfection. Very useful. :)

  2. eweber says:

    Katie, thanks for your kind words. Lately I’ve been thinking a great deal about how this intelligence is really a window into many other intelligences.

    A leap forward in intrapersonal IQ is a delightful rush into being more mindful in many other areas of our day. I am still learning, but am enjoying the journey.

    As you suggest – it rarely a perfect day, but it can be a brilliant one:-) May yours be just that Katie!

  3. Wow, Ellen! There’s so much depth to this post that it’s hard to know where to begin commenting!

    I believe you’ve amply illustrated just how important intrapersonal intelligence is to workplace success: to creating a truly workable dynamic among one’s colleagues, encouraging others to perform at their best, maintaining one’s own equilibrium, and fostering an environment of mutual creativity and innovation.

    Wonderful advice! Definitely plan to read this post through again to make sure I thoroughly absorb every one of its numerous insights!

    Thanks!
    Jeanne

  4. eweber says:

    Jeanne, many thanks for dropping by. It occurs to me that perhaps this intelligence is one we (I) sometimes tend to leave at home when we go to work.

    Yet when we consider the power of this inner intelligence over everything else we learn, lead, or do at work, we begin ti reflect more on its growth and wonder. Your remind us of its place in innovation and in a caring community cultivated at work.

    All to say thanks Jeanne for splashing intrapersonal intelligence our way today. May it circle full back to bless your own innovative leadership.

  5. Beautiful, Ellen.

    I think of Peter Koestenbaum’s advice to leaders who are having trouble managing their time. I’ll paraphrase the essence as this: you can live IN time or you can live time itself. To live time itself, Koestenbaum says, you have to “live your meanings.” People who feel constantly fragmented due to all the deadlines and overload are choosing, according to him, to not live their own leadership potentials in a meaningful way.

    To me, this is one of the most incredible (and painful) challenges. We often feel so, so driven, justifying the necessity of it, and yet Peter Koestenbaum is right. We can — must — choose meaning over such distress, if we are to activate our own leadership. To do so, of course, is also an firm act of rebellion against many of the broken workplaces people suffer in today, and few of us have the inner strength to allow forward all four of the ingredients that Koestenbaum calls out as necessary for that rebellion. He names these as the essence of leadership greatness: vision, courage, a sense of reality, and ethics. Together, I would have to say, they represent a very powerful foundation for intrapersonal awareness and, in turn, personal and organizational growth, renewal, and above all, positive change.

  6. eweber says:

    Wow – Dan, I did not know Peter Koestenbaum’s advice to leaders who are having trouble managing their time. Thanks for the way you paraphrased the essence as this: “you can live IN time or you can live time itself. To live time itself, Koestenbaum says, you have to “live your meanings.” People who feel constantly fragmented due to all the deadlines and overload are choosing, according to him, to not live their own leadership potentials in a meaningful way.” I plan to copy it and place on my computer!

    Love your challenge Dan! “We can — must — choose meaning over such distress, if we are to activate our own leadership.”
    I am also struck by Koestenbaum’s keys necessary for that rebellion – the essence of leadership greatness: vision, courage, a sense of reality, and ethics.

    Yes many times over – I agree that “together they represent a very powerful foundation for intrapersonal awareness and, in turn, personal and organizational growth, renewal, and above all, positive change.”

    No wonder the positive change follows! Interesting that also requires us to work far more in working memory, than in parts of the brain associated with traditions and habits! Another post though.

    Your reflection will keep me thinking for days about the brainpowered tools for these four! Thanks Dan!

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