Tag Archives: Ellen Weber

Brain Based Tasks for Older Learners

While we now know that students retain less from lectures, we question how to cultivate brain based cultures that trigger observable and impressive growth. Good news! It’s actually easier than most realize – to get older students active and growing in any class! Enter six little namungos with big brainy… Read more »

#8 of 25 Writer Brain Boosters

8. Address Authentic Problems– Interview peers to see what issues they care about. What questions are readers asking on your topic?  Listen with your brain. What concerns readers most and what possibilities would they like to consider further? Look at the research on your topic, but also listen to your… Read more »

#5 of 25 Writer Brain Boosters

5. Write to Fuse Arts and Science – The idea is  to engage both sides of the brain in order to increase innovation. Would you agree that most people tend to ask questions with predictable answers? Boring to boot! Involve readers in your questions and watch how it suddenly draws… Read more »

# 1 of 25 Writer Brain Boosters

1. Perk-up Moods – Boredom, it turns out, is a habit formed in brains and reinforced by words that lack punch. Help readers choose improved moods as their reality, Sidestep boredom! Jump start your writing with a what-if-question, such as, What if you could use information in this essay to… Read more »

Add Care to Character

eweber   December 21, 2012   No Comments on Add Care to Character

What if the popular 20Q (game show) converted into steps for a new culture of character that includes caring?

Two-footed questions improve the odds for building good character in schools, colleges and workplaces, in several ways. The two feet simply add action to asking, and include reflections on both sides of the brain for solutions.

Questioners arrive at the best answers by doing whatever it takes to help people move from traditional limitations into possibilities for finer characters in a new era.

Rather than blame others for violence, and unethical practices, notice that all questions below involve questioners in finding character-building solutions:

Heroic Ethical Leaders!

Have you ever lost something valuable? You bounce between feelings of helplessness and clinging to trust that somebody out there may help.

You image the worst, yet hope for any way to prevent disastrous consequences from your loss.

Before I discovered my bank card and credit cards missing the other day, Jenn Davison and Danielle Ouillette made an amazing ethical choice that changed my entire summer. How so?

What If Merges Melded Minds?

People often fear mergers and for good reason. Workers fear losing cooperation they’ve cultivated. Leaders fear compromise and gridlocks that robs progress. It doesn’t have to be that way.

A Brain on Laughter

Stopped in your tracks by pressures from financial woes? Tired of a job that’s going nowhere? Without good ideas to lead your innovation? Let laughter crack you up and stir up new aha moments when you need them most. Much more than coping, you can discover new initiatives through comedy, because a lighthearted attitude often brings eureka moments of unexpected inspiration. Research shows that with humor the brain increases activity in your anterior cingulated cortex, in preparation for problem solving.

From Mentor to Mindguide

Both profitable experts and talented upstarts claim to see unlimited potential in shared wisdom. Yet in most current mentoring programs, seasoned gurus advise clever cronies to operate much like themselves, in spite of rapidly changing workplace horizons. Few would disagree that it’s time to shift tutoring approaches to reflect more balanced and reciprocal coaching. Guidance based more on brainpower potential, and experience from differences than merely on age or seniority.

Why is Change so Hard?

Why is change from traditional to innovative so hard for some to embrace, and how do resources shift from people who guard status quo – to innovative leaders who sustain communities of passion? How would you answer?